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Back Bench MP Boris Johnson

raefil

Dolly Patron
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More corruption if that's genuine.......... We live in a democracy don't you know? :rolleyes:
I think ive said before, i have 2 accounts on yougov, one i align politically with labour the other i align politically with the tories. With one account i get quite a few polls a week the other im lucky if i get one a month.

Guess which.
 

Marcus Lawrenso

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People's Vote? That has never been on my agenda, nor have I made any reference to it, so I don't quite get the point that you are trying to make.

My view is that immediately after the 2017 election Corbyn was at his most powerful in the party. No-one was going to challenge his leadership unless something significantly changed.

At that point he should have prioritised retaining those that voted Labour, which required an outward facing focus from him. This would have been aided by a change in key personnel. Instead he did the opposite and focussed on trying to strengthen his faction's control of the Party. Absolute madness.

I voted for him as Party Leader because he was the only one of the four candidates who didn't take the Membership for granted, and had a policy programme that I could generally support. Once he became leader I hoped that he would step down after a couple of years and hand over to someone on the (soft) left who could demonstrate more ability as a leader. The unexpected 2017 election put paid to that.
Sorry should have explained it better - If there's a split between the hard to soft left and the centrists or whatever you call the right in the Labour Party over Brexit , the party should have been clearer in it's stance if constructively opposing the Tory No Deal / Hard Brexit .

I'm sorry but it gave Johnson ammunition with all this get Brexit done nonsense with a worn down general public ( the reality was that it was only just starting ) . the Tories were saying Labour's stance was confused during the Election .


The other points are the split in the Labour Party brought Jeremy Corbyn down ? and if the Labour Party wanted to give people a second referendum , things should have been put better and that would take time ? .


I tended to agree with Fiona Phillips in the Daily Mirror , when she said Jeremy Corbyn is not a leader , he's a professional protester ; and he's always has been or at least quite a bit of ? a contrarian
 

Marcus Lawrenso

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Talking of anti democratic, something i always suspected about the Yov gov polls is now starting to come out into the open.

FUuAnjUXoAEZ8DK


The thread in full


Always been suspicious of You Gov , a relative explained how they're done and basically the results have to fit the Government narrative and / or be favorable to the ruling party

 

wld

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Sorry should have explained it better - If there's a split between the hard to soft left and the centrists or whatever you call the right in the Labour Party over Brexit , the party should have been clearer in it's stance if constructively opposing the Tory No Deal / Hard Brexit .

I'm sorry but it gave Johnson ammunition with all this get Brexit done nonsense with a worn down general public ( the reality was that it was only just starting ) . the Tories were saying Labour's stance was confused during the Election .


The other points are the split in the Labour Party brought Jeremy Corbyn down ? and if the Labour Party wanted to give people a second referendum , things should have been put better and that would take time ? .


I tended to agree with Fiona Phillips in the Daily Mirror , when she said Jeremy Corbyn is not a leader , he's a professional protester ; and he's always has been or at least quite a bit of ? a contrarian
There’s a lot to agree with in your last few posts, especially the opinion Corbyn wasn’t strong enough with dissenters, in particular those wanting a second referendum. I would say, however, that we cannot ignore the role of the press in the outcome of BOTH elections. I also can never forgive the likes of Fiona Phillips for their constant parroting of the right wing media lines and even encouraging people to vote for other parties. They are at least partly to blame for the mess we are in because whatever anyone thinks, people are influenced by columnists like her.
 

Meldrew's Ghost

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Sorry should have explained it better - If there's a split between the hard to soft left and the centrists or whatever you call the right in the Labour Party over Brexit , the party should have been clearer in it's stance if constructively opposing the Tory No Deal / Hard Brexit .

I'm sorry but it gave Johnson ammunition with all this get Brexit done nonsense with a worn down general public ( the reality was that it was only just starting ) . the Tories were saying Labour's stance was confused during the Election .


The other points are the split in the Labour Party brought Jeremy Corbyn down ? and if the Labour Party wanted to give people a second referendum , things should have been put better and that would take time ? .


I tended to agree with Fiona Phillips in the Daily Mirror , when she said Jeremy Corbyn is not a leader , he's a professional protester ; and he's always has been or at least quite a bit of ? a contrarian

I think that JC created the impression that on Brexit he was conflicted between what he believed was best, and what many in the Party believed was best. This conflict was also actually mirrored in the Party's normal electoral base. Any leader would have had difficulties.
 

Marcus Lawrenso

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I think that JC created the impression that on Brexit he was conflicted between what he believed was best, and what many in the Party believed was best. This conflict was also actually mirrored in the Party's normal electoral base. Any leader would have had difficulties.
https://www.reuters.com/investigates/special-report/britain-eu-corbyn/

" Since becoming leader, Corbyn has appeared to change tack on some issues. He has said he opposes leaving the EU on terms that will hurt ordinary Britons and believes any “Brexit” deal must be put to a popular vote. He has supported Britain’s commitment to NATO and said he regrets calling members of Hamas and Hezbollah friends.

Corbyn’s opponents are unconvinced. They believe he still harbors dangerous, hard left views on the economy and foreign policy. Corbyn has a deep-rooted antipathy to Brussels that is unlikely to have changed, these people say. One of Britain’s longest-serving and most respected MPs, Ken Clarke, has known Corbyn for 30 years. “He doesn’t modify his views,” observed Clarke, a former Conservative minister. "




I had him down as a bit of an old 70s Bennite , but I totally get the opposition to a Neo Con , off the cliff , Disaster Capitalism , Hard or No Deal Tory Brexit

A lot of the Tory ' issues ' go back to the Major era 90s , apparently ! they secretly wanted to lose the 1992 election so they could sort themselves out over Europe .

There certainly was civil war whilst in opposition during the noughties
 

Meldrew's Ghost

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https://www.reuters.com/investigates/special-report/britain-eu-corbyn/

" Since becoming leader, Corbyn has appeared to change tack on some issues. He has said he opposes leaving the EU on terms that will hurt ordinary Britons and believes any “Brexit” deal must be put to a popular vote. He has supported Britain’s commitment to NATO and said he regrets calling members of Hamas and Hezbollah friends.

Corbyn’s opponents are unconvinced. They believe he still harbors dangerous, hard left views on the economy and foreign policy. Corbyn has a deep-rooted antipathy to Brussels that is unlikely to have changed, these people say. One of Britain’s longest-serving and most respected MPs, Ken Clarke, has known Corbyn for 30 years. “He doesn’t modify his views,” observed Clarke, a former Conservative minister. "




I had him down as a bit of an old 70s Bennite , but I totally get the opposition to a Neo Con , off the cliff , Disaster Capitalism , Hard or No Deal Tory Brexit

A lot of the Tory ' issues ' go back to the Major era 90s , apparently ! they secretly wanted to lose the 1992 election so they could sort themselves out over Europe .

There certainly was civil war whilst in opposition during the noughties

I think that JC's views about the EU go back to his days as a junior colleague of Tony Benn's. Benn was opposed to the EU and I think that Corbyn is too.
 

Marcus Lawrenso

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" All of which explains why I’m in Blackpool, the nation’s prolapsed arsehole, wearing the old hard hat and telling an audience of absolute dregs that they are my government’s priority.

These people can’t even earn a f**king wage. Their cretinous choices of career, partner and place of birth, and subsequent deprivation, are their own fault. And they’re my last hope. "

😜😜




 

Bardas

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I think that JC created the impression that on Brexit he was conflicted between what he believed was best, and what many in the Party believed was best. This conflict was also actually mirrored in the Party's normal electoral base. Any leader would have had difficulties.

Seemed to me that with an election coming up he didn`t want to antagonise half the voters by making his views clear, and basically chickened out by sitting on the fence .

That critical failure of leadership contributed to both the Brexit vote result, and to the Tory victory, IMO.
 

Portishead

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Romes burning at home and the baboon buggers off to where hes safer, to spout and deflect about a total irrelevance. Those tory MPs must feel so proud of themselves. Waiting and praying for a summer of riots to shore up their support from the haves, afraid for their property.
 

Regardless

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Romes burning at home and the baboon buggers off to where hes safer, to spout and deflect about a total irrelevance. Those tory MPs must feel so proud of themselves. Waiting and praying for a summer of riots to shore up their support from the haves, afraid for their property.

What?
 

raefil

Dolly Patron
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I assume Johnson went on holiday...... Like his dad did when under curfew ( like father like son ( I added that bit ) ) ...

I also assume the " riots " are a reference to divide and conquer.

No doubt Pete will correct me if I'm talking bollocks.. :D
He was supposed to be meeting people in the North of England, decided he would get less adverse publicity by having pictures taken with Zelensky instead.

Hes an utter bastard hes now using the troubles in Ukraine to protect himself from what hes done to this country.
 
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