COVID Vaccine Poll

Will you get vaccinated?

  • Yes - as soon as they ratify/license it

    Votes: 21 21.6%
  • Yes - but not for 6 months till we've seen more research into it

    Votes: 2 2.1%
  • Yes - but not for a considerable time to understand it's side effects/effectiveness

    Votes: 9 9.3%
  • Maybe - but only willing to consider it after much more research/investigations

    Votes: 11 11.3%
  • No

    Votes: 12 12.4%
  • Yes- but vaccinate those most at risk first

    Votes: 42 43.3%

  • Total voters
    97

Bobbage

4th Choice Keeper
Patron
Was it the vaccine that did it? How would you prove that? But at least you're still alive.

Please, spare me the condescending bullshit.

The virus nearly killed me last March and after a year of being mocked by my own Doctor and battling the post viral fatigue, I went from having my breathing stopping in my sleep and being barely able to walk 30m to running 15miles as if it was nothing two days before having the vaccine.

I had the vaccine and I'm back at square one. A month later and I can barely run 2miles and need to sleep for the rest of the day. All for a vaccine that still means I can catch and transmit the virus anyway.

God knows what the long term implications are.

People who have had the virus should not be having the AZ vaccine.
 

Funky Monk

Forum Patron
Patron
Please, spare me the condescending bullshit.

The virus nearly killed me last March and after a year of being mocked by my own Doctor and battling the post viral fatigue, I went from having my breathing stopping in my sleep and being barely able to walk 30m to running 15miles as if it was nothing two days before having the vaccine.

I had the vaccine and I'm back at square one. A month later and I can barely run 2miles and need to sleep for the rest of the day. All for a vaccine that still means I can catch and transmit the virus anyway.

God knows what the long term implications are.

People who have had the virus should not be having the AZ vaccine.
If the virus nearly killed you last year (sorry to hear that, obviously) you know better than most how important it is that we vaccinate the (majority of the) population.
 

Bobbage

4th Choice Keeper
Patron
If the virus nearly killed you last year (sorry to hear that, obviously) you know better than most how important it is that we vaccinate the (majority of the) population.

Oh don't get me wrong FM, it's crucial older people or those with a weakened immune system get the vaccine to stimulate a response to reduce hospitalisation and risk of death BUT it has no benefit to those who are younger and have a normal immune response (those who would be asymptomatic) and it has a very negative impact on people who's immune system would over-react to the virus in the first place. You'd be better off getting the virus naturally and taking the appropriate precautions.
 

daddyman16

Manager
If the virus nearly killed you last year (sorry to hear that, obviously) you know better than most how important it is that we vaccinate the (majority of the) population.

It's a bit of a pyrrhic victory to have a vaccine that stops a virus from killing you, but then could worsen your quality of life permanently.
It wouldn't be a straightforward decision to take if that outcome was presented on the table beforehand.
 

northender2

Forum Patron
Patron
Oh don't get me wrong FM, it's crucial older people or those with a weakened immune system get the vaccine to stimulate a response to reduce hospitalisation and risk of death BUT it has no benefit to those who are younger and have a normal immune response (those who would be asymptomatic) and it has a very negative impact on people who's immune system would over-react to the virus in the first place. You'd be better off getting the virus naturally and taking the appropriate precautions.
but surely its also vital that younger people and those with good immune systems also get the vaccine so they don't spread it to their vulnerable parents/grandparents
 
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Funky Monk

Forum Patron
Patron
It's a bit of a pyrrhic victory to have a vaccine that stops a virus from killing you, but then could worsen your quality of life permanently.
It wouldn't be a straightforward decision to take if that outcome was presented on the table beforehand.
Covid could worsen your quality of life permanently - you don’t know if you’re vulnerable or not. I’d say it’s more risky to avoid the vaccine and doesn’t help to lower transmission, lower the spread and, fingers crossed, get us back to ‘normal’ more quickly.
 

LostinSpace

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Staff member
Patron
Oh don't get me wrong FM, it's crucial older people or those with a weakened immune system get the vaccine to stimulate a response to reduce hospitalisation and risk of death BUT it has no benefit to those who are younger and have a normal immune response (those who would be asymptomatic) and it has a very negative impact on people who's immune system would over-react to the virus in the first place. You'd be better off getting the virus naturally and taking the appropriate precautions.
As Northender points out, it’s not just about you, though tbh I might think the same given your experience.
The RNA vaccines (Pfizer and Moderna) are the safest and they’re the ones being offered to the under 30s . It’s not so much to protect them, more about society as a whole. Remember that many vulnerable people can’t have the vaccine themselves so they rely on other people not transmitting the virus.
 

Sepp Blatter

Liz Truss Groupie
Patron
Please, spare me the condescending bullshit.

The virus nearly killed me last March and after a year of being mocked by my own Doctor and battling the post viral fatigue, I went from having my breathing stopping in my sleep and being barely able to walk 30m to running 15miles as if it was nothing two days before having the vaccine.

I had the vaccine and I'm back at square one. A month later and I can barely run 2miles and need to sleep for the rest of the day. All for a vaccine that still means I can catch and transmit the virus anyway.

God knows what the long term implications are.

People who have had the virus should not be having the AZ vaccine.
Read a study the other day which stated that people who have had covid are much more likely to suffer systemic side effects from vaccines. Side effects are more likely if you are younger, too.

Very surprised that they are still recommending it for people who have had covid when this is very well understood.

Hope things improve for you soon, Bobbage - you have really been through the wringer with this.
 

Bobbage

4th Choice Keeper
Patron
As Northender points out, it’s not just about you, though tbh I might think the same given your experience.
The RNA vaccines (Pfizer and Moderna) are the safest and they’re the ones being offered to the under 30s . It’s not so much to protect them, more about society as a whole. Remember that many vulnerable people can’t have the vaccine themselves so they rely on other people not transmitting the virus.

Hence me going against my own instict and getting it in the first place when, for reasons highlighted earlier in the thread, I said I wouldn't be.

I did my research and wanted the Pfizer vaccine but was told it wasn't possible. The following week, a drop in centre was set up for people wanting the Pfizer vaccine. Trust me LiS I am angry beyond belief about this!
 

222Mark

Serial killer of note
Patron
Was it the vaccine that did it? How would you prove that? But at least you're still alive.
Sounds just like my Mrs did, no coincidences there. Plenty more have had covid and survived than passed away, that kind of comment just puts pressure on people.

My Mrs had the Pfizer vaccine btw.
 

Regardless

Forum Patron
Patron
but surely its also vital that younger people and those with good immune systems also get the vaccine so they don't spread it to their vulnerable parents/grandparents

Vital? That’s very arguable IMO. I have had one vaccination- soon to be two. The next generation up in our family have had two already and statically, if we catch Covid, we’re now very unlikely to be hospitalised by it.

My personal opinion is that my children should not be vaccinated. If they catch it and pass it on to us, then we should be prepared to take our (hugely improved) chances. We should not expect healthy young people, the breeding generation of our species, to take unnecessary risks on our behalf

As LiS points out above, the situation of those unable to be vaccinated is a thorny one - and it’s hard to avoid sounding cold because there’s a tough moral choice to be made. In principle I can reverse LiS’s question and ask why a relatively few vulnerable unvaccinated people should automatically expect an entire generation to take these vaccines, when they may pose more risk than they remove?

Again talking about principle only, we allow the sale of nuts, despite known fatal consequences of even breathing in their aroma for some people. And it’s not like nuts are essential. So IMO, that’s a counter argument against those who take LiS’s view. I don’t claim it to be a winning argument. I don’t know.
 

LostinSpace

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Staff member
Patron
Hence me going against my own instict and getting it in the first place when, for reasons highlighted earlier in the thread, I said I wouldn't be.

I did my research and wanted the Pfizer vaccine but was told it wasn't possible. The following week, a drop in centre was set up for people wanting the Pfizer vaccine. Trust me LiS I am angry beyond belief about this!
That's understandable, as I said I might think the same given your experience.
 

shabbagaz

Forum Patron
Patron
I'm surprised they haven't withdrawn the AZ vaccine given the higher number of side effects it seems to have. One of my friends at work had it - she is the same age as me but had her's before I had mine - she had AZ and it wiped her out for over a week and she's not normally ill.

I got lucky as the day before I was due to have mine, they announced the new guidance for under 40's. Although cancelling the appointment half an hour before I was due to attend was ridiculous, I'm glad they did and I had a the Pfizer vaccine the following week (had a sore arm and my tinnitus spiked on a couple of separate nights but other than that I was ok).
 

LostinSpace

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Staff member
Patron
Vital? That’s very arguable IMO. I have had one vaccination- soon to be two. The next generation up in our family have had two already and statically, if we catch Covid, we’re now very unlikely to be hospitalised by it.

My personal opinion is that my children should not be vaccinated. If they catch it and pass it on to us, then we should be prepared to take our (hugely improved) chances. We should not expect healthy young people, the breeding generation of our species, to take unnecessary risks on our behalf

As LiS points out above, the situation of those unable to be vaccinated is a thorny one - and it’s hard to avoid sounding cold because there’s a tough moral choice to be made. In principle I can reverse LiS’s question and ask why a relatively few vulnerable unvaccinated people should automatically expect an entire generation to take these vaccines, when they may pose more risk than they remove?

Again talking about principle only, we allow the sale of nuts, despite known fatal consequences of even breathing in their aroma for some people. And it’s not like nuts are essential. So IMO, that’s a counter argument against those who take LiS’s view. I don’t claim it to be a winning argument. I don’t know.

The same question arises about vulnerable people in any situation, the disabled, those with genetic disorders, those with mental health issues etc. Disproportionately caring about the disadvantaged is what makes us civilised imo, in the wild it's only the strongest that survive.
 

LostinSpace

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Staff member
Patron
There's no conspiracy theory or agenda, I'm just sharing my own opinion based on my personal experience.
I didn't say there was a conspiracy theory or agenda, I'm agreeing with you.
 

Regardless

Forum Patron
Patron
The same question arises about vulnerable people in any situation, the disabled, those with genetic disorders, those with mental health issues etc. Disproportionately caring about the disadvantaged is what makes us civilised imo, in the wild it's only the strongest that survive.

Do you think we should have a global ban the sale of nuts and nut products?
 

pnewortham

Forum Patron
Patron
Clearly, for anyone who's had negative effects, it's not a good thing. God willing everyone does as well as possible and doesn't suffer serious side effects.

But we must remember the science and statistics at play here. The vaccine isn't 100.000000% safe. Nobody said it was. No medical intervention ever is. But the point is, the global scientific community and regulatory agencies are in solid agreement that the harms of the vaccine are outweighed by those of the virus.

And that's all this is. A balance of risk. Unfortunately some will suffer.

If our future over the next few years is repeat vaccinations, then the pharma R&D effort will continue to improve the safety & performance of these vaccines. Our knowledge will improve and the ability to match certain vaccines & treatments to certain groups, will mean fewer & fewer side effects / better outcomes.
 

LostinSpace

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Staff member
Patron
Do you think we should have a global ban the sale of nuts and nut products?
Predictable reply there Reg.

If you want a serious answer, we go to a great deal of effort to label food produce appropriately and educate people about issues like this.

I am very much against banning anything that's useful or beneficial, I am though in favour of managing it.
 
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