MLB 2020

Sid Snot

Manager - East Cheam FC
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Jays first games in Buffalo will be August 11th against the Miami Marlins. I believe that's a five game series - you don't see many of them in the regular season.
 

Sid Snot

Manager - East Cheam FC
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Jays up 4-0 middle of the 6th. Lose 6-5 in the 10th. I'm guessing relief pitching woes.
 
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jcfartpants

jcfartpants

Chief Anal Acoustician
So guessing what is currently happening isn't normal?
Actually Paddy I was being a bit unfair on the A's. Between I think 2013 and 2017 when I started watching the A's had a terrible record but since I started supporting them, I've clearly had a major impact as they've made the play offs (well the wild card game) in each of the last two seasons.

Ah I've seen the film. Didn't realise it was them. 5-0 up after the 1st
Yes, Brad Pitt played Billy Beane, who is still at the top of the A's organisation.

If you saw Ohtani's first innings pitching, it was a good example of a pitcher out of control and being taken out of the game early by the manager. He's only young and is a good prospect with bat and ball but it basically lost them the game even though they nearly came back.
 
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jcfartpants

jcfartpants

Chief Anal Acoustician
All teams on either 2-1 or 1-2.

The entire O's team have been diagnosed with vertigo after moving up to second in the division standings.
 

paddysr

Bearded Beauty
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Actually Paddy I was being a bit unfair on the A's. Between I think 2013 and 2017 when I started watching the A's had a terrible record but since I started supporting them, I've clearly had a major impact as they've made the play offs (well the wild card game) in each of the last two seasons.


Yes, Brad Pitt played Billy Beane, who is still at the top of the A's organisation.

If you saw Ohtani's first innings pitching, it was a good example of a pitcher out of control and being taken out of the game early by the manager. He's only young and is a good prospect with bat and ball but it basically lost them the game even though they nearly came back.
Yeah it was a terrible first innings. He didn't do much wrong though a lot of the balls looked marginal but I guess that is the difference between the top pros
 
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jcfartpants

jcfartpants

Chief Anal Acoustician
Yeah it was a terrible first innings. He didn't do much wrong though a lot of the balls looked marginal but I guess that is the difference between the top pros
It is, but sometimes the top pitchers have a bad day and can cave in. They never get criticised for that because it's a confidence sport and if a pitcher's confidence gets shot then they're done for. Generally they'll come back 5 days later and be fine.
 

Sid Snot

Manager - East Cheam FC
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Four days into Major League Baseball's attempt to play a 60-game regular-season schedule amid the coronavirus pandemic, MLB's plan is already running into problems.
MLB announced Monday that the Miami Marlins have postponed their home game on Monday against the Baltimore Orioles. At least 14 Marlins players and staff members tested positive for the COVID-19, a high-ranking MLB official told USA TODAY Sports. The official spoke on the condition of anonymity due to the confidential nature of the information. The Philadelphia Phillies' home game against the New York Yankees was also postponed, MLB announced.

After finishing their series against the Phillies on Sunday, the team will remain in Philadelphia and continue coronavirus testing. According to a statement from MLB, "the members of the Marlins’ traveling party are self-quarantining in place while awaiting the outcome of those results."

What other teams could be affected?

Braves:
There is a possibility that the infections occurred Wednesday when the Marlins traveled to and from Atlanta for an exhibition game against the Braves.

What about the other games?

As of now, MLB plans to continue with the rest of Monday's schedule.

How could the Marlins fill out their roster?

Each team has a 60-person player pool from which it can tap into, with 33 of those players traveling with the team (30 active and three "taxi squad" members). Teams can replenish their player pools with additonal minor leaguers or free agents when needed due to positive coronavirus tests. .

How have the Phillies reacted?

Phillies outfielder Bryce Harper wore a mask when he ran the bases as he knew several Marlins were playing despite not knowing the results of their pregame COVID-19 tests, per The Philadelphia Inquirer.
“I thought we were all ready to go, ready to play,” Harper said. “We weren’t really too worried about it. Like I said, we do a great job as an organization really following protocols and doing things the right way. Not really getting close to guys, of course, first base and when you’re in the batter's box, you’re going to be as close to other players, but I think we do a good job as a club understanding that we need to stay away and wear a mask when we need to. Hopefully, we can all stay healthy and the odds will be in our favor.”

What are other players saying?
#Brewers pitcher Josh Lindbloom on Marlins news: "Somebody might have to make a hard decision." Said you need to take the immediate emotions out of it and decide what has to be done to keep everyone safe.

How will postponed games be made up?

Games can potentially be made up as doubleheaders or on off days, although MLB' plan to play a 60-game schedule within 60 days already limits flexibility.
 

Sid Snot

Manager - East Cheam FC
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There's some more here if you have the time and the inclination :).....

a baseball player holding a bat standing next to a catcher and an umpire: Jesus Aguilar #24, Brian Anderson #15, Francisco Cervelli #29, and Corey Dickerson #23 of the Miami Marlins react after a three run home run by Anderson in the top of the fifth inning against the Philadelphia Phillies at Citizens Bank Park on July 26, 2020 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
© Mitchell Leff/Getty Images Jesus Aguilar #24, Brian Anderson #15, Francisco Cervelli #29, and Corey Dickerson #23 of the Miami Marlins react after a three run home run by Anderson in the top of the fifth inning against the Philadelphia Phillies at Citizens Bank Park on July 26, 2020 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

From the moment that sports leagues were shuttered more than four months ago, a single question has hovered over all the return-to-play scenarios, and their bubbles and testing strategies and restrictions on takeout food: what happens if a team suffers a coronavirus outbreak? It has taken Major League Baseball all of three days to force an answer to that question. We just don’t know what it is yet.

On Sunday the Coronavirus Hotspot Marlins played the third game of their season in Philadelphia against the Phillies. They took the field despite reports of four positive COVID tests among players — though nothing was confirmed officially — and then manager Don Mattingly said the team would stay in Philadelphia overnight rather than return home to Miami as scheduled. Again, while nothing was formally confirmed, the clear implication was that the COVID Epicentre Marlins were waiting on more test results.

By Monday morning, the disaster scenario: ESPN reported that another 10 Marlins players and staff had tested positive for the virus, and the team’s scheduled game against the Baltimore Orioles was cancelled. Philadelphia’s Monday game against the New York Yankees, who would have used the same locker room at Citizens Bank Park that the Marlins just departed, has also been postponed.

It was always possible that Major League Baseball’s relatively lax plan would blow up in its face this spectacularly, but that it happened quite so soon is a surprise. All the problems that were identified weeks ago, when MLB hurriedly threw together a 60-game schedule bereft of any kind of safety bubble like those deployed by the NBA, NHL and MLS, have quickly come to pass.

Baseball players are free to roam around in the wild, which is a particular issue in places like Miami, presently home to one of the highest rates of new coronavirus infections in the developed world. The Marlins would have travelled to Philadelphia late last week, so it is likely that the Player Zero on their roster who was initially infected had the virus when the team left south Florida. MLB’s safety protocol requires players and staff to be tested every two days for COVID-19, and the theory is that the frequency would detect positive cases quickly enough to isolate them and prevent spread around the team. But it has long been known that people can potentially carry the virus, and spread it to others, for days before they might show up as a positive case, even if they never develop symptoms. And so, some unknown Marlin could have contracted the virus on Wednesday, hopped on a plane on Thursday, and spent a couple of days in relatively close contact with his teammates before his first initial positive test. Some of those teammates then had a couple of days where they could have carried the virus before their own positive tests and, boom, outbreak.

a group of baseball players standing on top of a field:  Jul 26, 2020; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; The Miami Marlins celebrate following their victory over the Philadelphia Phillies at Citizens Bank Park. Mandatory Credit: James Lang-USA TODAY Sports ORG XMIT: USATSI-428330
Jul 26, 2020; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; The Miami Marlins celebrate following their victory over the Philadelphia Phillies at Citizens Bank Park. Mandatory Credit: James Lang-USA TODAY Sports ORG XMIT: USATSI-428330

Until the Marlins and MLB explain what happened, that’s the most likely scenario, although it could also be a result of protocols not being followed, like a test being missed, or a delay in results. Several teams cancelled workout days when results were delayed earlier in training camp, but now that the games count the Marlins might have just decided to suit up anyway.

Whatever the process that led to this point, it is, first, a grim situation for the Marlins. Suddenly a bunch of players have contracted an illness that could have long-term effects on their health. Beyond that, it is hard to overstate how bad this is for Major League Baseball. Somehow the Marlins were allowed to take the field on Sunday despite multiple reported positive tests, which likely means some of those among the new total of 14 cases were playing against the Phillies. How no one in charge realized that a batch of positive tests — even a small batch — on a single team signalled a possible team-wide outbreak is impossible to understand at this point in the pandemic. Is Commissioner Rob Manfred the last person to realize that several sudden COVID positives in a workplace setting will almost always uncover new positive cases among the same group? This is true of grocery stores and factories, hair salons and bars — and those co-workers don’t shower together. Honestly, does Manfred not watch the news? Read a paper?

Major League Baseball will reportedly hold an emergency meeting on Monday, but the path forward is unclear. The Marlins will be unable to field something close to a normal roster for at least a couple of weeks, which from a competitive sense is an extremely long time in this truncated season. (Pause for obvious joke about how the Marlins haven’t fielded a real major-league roster for years.) But if their games are scrubbed, what do their various opponents do for those games? Play each other to make up the lost dates? Can a team with an outbreak just be deleted from the season?

One might think that Manfred and his colleagues in the league offices have planned for just such a scenario. But it is a lack of planning, and an astonishing lack of foresight, that has brought Major League Baseball to this place.


Maybe, just maybe, the Canadian Government made the right decision not allowing the Jays to play home games in Toronto ;).
 

Bjarki the Bald

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Could be a very short season!

I hadn’t realised they weren’t operating in bubbles, I had assumed it was more like what was happening with the test cricketers here
 
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jcfartpants

jcfartpants

Chief Anal Acoustician
Could be a very short season!

I hadn’t realised they weren’t operating in bubbles, I had assumed it was more like what was happening with the test cricketers here
I think what it will mean is that whichever team goes on to win this season won't be regarded as the true champions.

California is a hotspot yet the teams there have, four games in, not been apparently affected yet.
 

Sid Snot

Manager - East Cheam FC
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a group of baseball players standing on top of a field


The New York Yankees and Philadelphia Phillies have had their game at Citizens Bank Park postponed Tuesday for the second straight day, a source told ESPN's Jeff Passan.
The Phillies were scheduled to host the Yankees on Monday and Tuesday before the COVID-19 outbreak within the Miami Marlins came to light. The Marlins occupied the visiting clubhouse in Philadelphia on opening weekend.
As of Tuesday morning, no players from the Phillies have tested positive for COVID-19, reports Joel Sherman of the New York Post. Several members of the club lobbied for a second round of testing before returning to play, and players and staff will be retested at the ballpark, a source told The Athletic's Matt Gelb.
The Yankees were told that their Tuesday game was postponed due to an abundance of caution, according to ESPN's Karl Ravech.
The Yankees and Phillies are scheduled to play at Yankee Stadium on Wednesday and Thursday in what was supposed to be the second part of a four-game series.
New York opened its season with two wins in three games against the Washington Nationals, while Philadelphia began with two losses in three contests versus the Marlins.
 
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