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Preston's Little Ireland

Yep, I tried to catch up on the family history over in Ireland and found it really hard going. My grandmother was a Leddy and at the start of the 1900s around 80% of the families along the lane they lived on were also Leddy's, so working out who were direct family was nigh on impossible.

Also doesn't help that many records held in Dublin Castle were destroyed.

Tough task but keep going fella 👍
Practice makes perfect when it comes to working out family history, pretty soon patterns will emerge so you'll know whether something could be what you're looking for or just a coincidence.

It's also luck of the draw. Leddy is a rare Irish name and appeared around 750 times in Ireland in 1901 but around two thirds of these were in Cavan - hence the one lane being full of them. However, say a future relative of yours didn't know the family history but came across the name Leddy then they'd get a good clue that Cavan was the county of origin and could use that to see if other clues fitted.

Everyone has their own preference for what they want to know about their family history. Some people don't care. Others may be happy to simply know they have Irish heritage. Or some people may want to know the county of origin. For me, I have to be awkward and want to know the exact small plot of land they farmed prior to either being evicted or the potato crop failing and they had no choice but to leave or starve to death.

I think I'll one day work it out for the Dempsey's, Waldron's, Sweeney's and Lundy's. Might be more difficult for the Flynn's and Costello's, simply down to the number of families with that name in County Mayo.
 
@Oh Hughie Costello

Serious question here, does Mayo (Mayonnaise) originate from County Mayo? Much like Eccles Cake, Chorley Cake, Bakewell Tart, Champagne, etc?

I always had it down as being of French origin.

No, I haven't Googled. Thought I'd ask you and see what answer appears, probably be more thought provoking an answer going off this well detailed thread thus far. 👍
 
@Oh Hughie Costello

Serious question here, does Mayo (Mayonnaise) originate from County Mayo? Much like Eccles Cake, Chorley Cake, Bakewell Tart, Champagne, etc?

I always had it down as being of French origin.

No, I haven't Googled. Thought I'd ask you and see what answer appears, probably be more thought provoking an answer going off this well detailed thread thus far. 👍
You was right about it being French - early 19th century.

90% of people in County Mayo lived on a diet of potatoes so if they had any hens on their small "farm" the eggs would have either gone directly to the landlord or been sold to pay his rent. They didn't have fancy condiments on their food.

County Mayo gets its name from the river Moy which follows through the middle of the county. Most of the towns and villages in Mayo (including Foxford where a lot of Preston Irish came from) are on the river Moy so it's Mayo's version of the Nile.
 
@Oh Hughie Costello

Serious question here, does Mayo (Mayonnaise) originate from County Mayo? Much like Eccles Cake, Chorley Cake, Bakewell Tart, Champagne, etc?

I always had it down as being of French origin.

No, I haven't Googled. Thought I'd ask you and see what answer appears, probably be more thought provoking an answer going off this well detailed thread thus far. 👍
No
 
Yep same family, is Pat still alive then? My Grandad was Edward Joseph Duffy I believe his family lived in the Miles Platting area he Married Winifred and they Had Margaret and Colin (My Dad) Grandad had a Brother Frank and a Sister Alice as well I think but they lived in Newcastle with their other halves, so Thomas and Mary would be my Great Grandparents, amazing, small world.
Decided to look at the Duffy's in more detail again.

Edward Joseph Duffy would have been a toddler when he moved to Preston. He was born in 1896 in Manchester but had a sister Ann who was born in Preston in 1898 - Ann died aged 2 so never appears on a census. In 1901 Edward J Duffy was living at 14 Victoria Street in Preston and his father Edward T Duffy had his occupation down as a pattern-maker (wood).

In 1901 they had a 65 year old widow Ann Webster from Castlebar in Ireland living with them. There's no clear link as to why she's lodging with them but Ann Webster might have been living in Manchester in 1881 so she could be an aunt of Mary Jane Bostock - Edward T Duffy's wife.

There are two Mary Jane Bostock's in Manchester born around 1876 but her parents are more than likely James Bostock and Margaret Suggit from Manchester. James Bostock was a manager in a factory so possibly better off than the average Manc at the time.

Edward T Duffy - born 1871 in Manchester - had three sisters: Martha, Catherine and Alice who all remained in Manchester so he might have moved to Preston for work. Alice married a James Allen and had a few children but Martha and Catherine remained spinsters.

His parents were Edward Duffy born in Manchester around 1827 and Hannah Smith born in Manchester around 1833. Hannah Smith died around 1872 but it looks like Edward senior senior didn't remarry with possibly Martha taking on the "mother" role for Edward T Duffy.

Hannah Smith is difficult to trace but she married Edward Duffy in Manchester in 1862 so that marriage certificate might provide her father's name and her address before marriage so that could help.

There is an Edward Duffy born around 1827 living in Ancoats in 1841. He's listed as born in Manchester but his mother Isabella Duffy is listed as born in Ireland. This Edward Duffy has an older sister Nancy born in Ireland so it's possible that the Duffy's moved to Manchester around 1825 and with a bit more effort clues might come up as to whereabouts in Ireland the Duffy's are from.
 
@Oh Hughie Costello

Serious question here, does Mayo (Mayonnaise) originate from County Mayo? Much like Eccles Cake, Chorley Cake, Bakewell Tart, Champagne, etc?

I always had it down as being of French origin.

No, I haven't Googled. Thought I'd ask you and see what answer appears, probably be more thought provoking an answer going off this well detailed thread thus far. 👍
Ah but the Guinness!
 
Favourite tale I was told on a visit to County Cork.
A fellow was telling me about what Ireland did with prisoners of war in ww2.
Of course they were neutral but any soldiers from the allies or the axis sides were taken prisoner.
His words were to the effect, (imagine told in a broad Cork 'brogue', with the help of a few pints of the dark stuff)

'They gave em a place to live, a bicycle and enough to eat. They worked the fields during the day and had enough for a couple of pints of Guinness of the evening...You know what? Nobody tried to escape!'
 
@Oh Hughie Costello

Serious question here, does Mayo (Mayonnaise) originate from County Mayo? Much like Eccles Cake, Chorley Cake, Bakewell Tart, Champagne, etc?

I always had it down as being of French origin.

No, I haven't Googled. Thought I'd ask you and see what answer appears, probably be more thought provoking an answer going off this well detailed thread thus far. 👍
Mayonnaise comes from Mahon, the capital of Menorca.

"Mahon-aisse".
 
You was right about it being French - early 19th century.

90% of people in County Mayo lived on a diet of potatoes so if they had any hens on their small "farm" the eggs would have either gone directly to the landlord or been sold to pay his rent. They didn't have fancy condiments on their food.

County Mayo gets its name from the river Moy which follows through the middle of the county. Most of the towns and villages in Mayo (including Foxford where a lot of Preston Irish came from) are on the river Moy so it's Mayo's version of the Nile.
That's not the case. The name Mayo comes from the Irish Maigh Eo which means plain of the yew trees. It was first a village in Connacht (now Mayo Abbey). The county name is relatively recent (16th C). The Irish for the river Moy is completely different to the Irish for Mayo.

I was originally told all this stuff by the first Mrs E who was a native of Kiltimagh, Co Mayo and an Irish speaker (well she was educated through the medium of Irish between the ages of 11 and 18).

PS I have found your stuff on the irish community in Preston absolutely fascinating.
 
Decided to look at the Duffy's in more detail again.

Edward Joseph Duffy would have been a toddler when he moved to Preston. He was born in 1896 in Manchester but had a sister Ann who was born in Preston in 1898 - Ann died aged 2 so never appears on a census. In 1901 Edward J Duffy was living at 14 Victoria Street in Preston and his father Edward T Duffy had his occupation down as a pattern-maker (wood).

In 1901 they had a 65 year old widow Ann Webster from Castlebar in Ireland living with them. There's no clear link as to why she's lodging with them but Ann Webster might have been living in Manchester in 1881 so she could be an aunt of Mary Jane Bostock - Edward T Duffy's wife.

There are two Mary Jane Bostock's in Manchester born around 1876 but her parents are more than likely James Bostock and Margaret Suggit from Manchester. James Bostock was a manager in a factory so possibly better off than the average Manc at the time.

Edward T Duffy - born 1871 in Manchester - had three sisters: Martha, Catherine and Alice who all remained in Manchester so he might have moved to Preston for work. Alice married a James Allen and had a few children but Martha and Catherine remained spinsters.

His parents were Edward Duffy born in Manchester around 1827 and Hannah Smith born in Manchester around 1833. Hannah Smith died around 1872 but it looks like Edward senior senior didn't remarry with possibly Martha taking on the "mother" role for Edward T Duffy.

Hannah Smith is difficult to trace but she married Edward Duffy in Manchester in 1862 so that marriage certificate might provide her father's name and her address before marriage so that could help.

There is an Edward Duffy born around 1827 living in Ancoats in 1841. He's listed as born in Manchester but his mother Isabella Duffy is listed as born in Ireland. This Edward Duffy has an older sister Nancy born in Ireland so it's possible that the Duffy's moved to Manchester around 1825 and with a bit more effort clues might come up as to whereabouts in Ireland the Duffy's are from.
Edward Joseph Duffy was my grandfather, Edward was a name passed down the Family, my father being Edward Colin, Thomas is also another name passed down, from the Jemsons (Winfred Jemson married Edward joseph Duffy) Thomas was her Brother who was killed in WW1.
 
That's not the case. The name Mayo comes from the Irish Maigh Eo which means plain of the yew trees. It was first a village in Connacht (now Mayo Abbey). The county name is relatively recent (16th C). The Irish for the river Moy is completely different to the Irish for Mayo.

I was originally told all this stuff by the first Mrs E who was a native of Kiltimagh, Co Mayo and an Irish speaker (well she was educated through the medium of Irish between the ages of 11 and 18).

PS I have found your stuff on the irish community in Preston absolutely fascinating.
Yes, you're right I should have double checked the origin of the name before posting.

It's interesting you say that the first Mrs E was an Irish speaker - they say a lot of the Irish from the west coast spoke Irish as a first language but we have little evidence as to which individual families did.

There was an Irish family who lived on Canal Street since the 1840s who have descendants who are still living in Preston with the surname Prendergast. However, the name appears on census and BMD records as all forms of spellings such as Pindergist and Pendergest. They were from Castlebar but it suggests to me that they either had a very strong Mayo accent or spoke Irish as a first language.
 
Edward Joseph Duffy was my grandfather, Edward was a name passed down the Family, my father being Edward Colin, Thomas is also another name passed down, from the Jemsons (Winfred Jemson married Edward joseph Duffy) Thomas was her Brother who was killed in WW1.
I had a quick look at the Jemson's but they're not that easy to trace. Is it possible that they were Scottish and the name was originally spelt different?

Also had a look further at the potential Duffy family on the 1841 census. The Isabella Duffy on it died in 1842 and Nancy Duffy looks like by 1851 she'd had a couple of children out of wedlock and was giving her place of birth as Manchester.

Duffy is a common Irish surname so that makes tracing them in Ireland more difficult but Isabella is a rare forename in Ireland so there's likely to only be one Isabella who married a Duffy around 1825 so that is a possible starting point.
 
@Oh Hughie Costello

Serious question here, does Mayo (Mayonnaise) originate from County Mayo? Much like Eccles Cake, Chorley Cake, Bakewell Tart, Champagne, etc?

I always had it down as being of French origin.

No, I haven't Googled. Thought I'd ask you and see what answer appears, probably be more thought provoking an answer going off this well detailed thread thus far. 👍
It came from Mahon - Menorca

French named it afterwards.
 
I had a quick look at the Jemson's but they're not that easy to trace. Is it possible that they were Scottish and the name was originally spelt different?

Also had a look further at the potential Duffy family on the 1841 census. The Isabella Duffy on it died in 1842 and Nancy Duffy looks like by 1851 she'd had a couple of children out of wedlock and was giving her place of birth as Manchester.

Duffy is a common Irish surname so that makes tracing them in Ireland more difficult but Isabella is a rare forename in Ireland so there's likely to only be one Isabella who married a Duffy around 1825 so that is a possible starting point.
I think originally the Jemsons may hail back to Scotland sometimes it’s spelt Gemson
 
Practice makes perfect when it comes to working out family history, pretty soon patterns will emerge so you'll know whether something could be what you're looking for or just a coincidence.

It's also luck of the draw. Leddy is a rare Irish name and appeared around 750 times in Ireland in 1901 but around two thirds of these were in Cavan - hence the one lane being full of them. However, say a future relative of yours didn't know the family history but came across the name Leddy then they'd get a good clue that Cavan was the county of origin and could use that to see if other clues fitted.

Everyone has their own preference for what they want to know about their family history. Some people don't care. Others may be happy to simply know they have Irish heritage. Or some people may want to know the county of origin. For me, I have to be awkward and want to know the exact small plot of land they farmed prior to either being evicted or the potato crop failing and they had no choice but to leave or starve to death.

I think I'll one day work it out for the Dempsey's, Waldron's, Sweeney's and Lundy's. Might be more difficult for the Flynn's and Costello's, simply down to the number of families with that name in County Mayo.

Lundy?

Do you leave the front gate open at home?

I’d keep that name quiet in a number of pubs at either end of our (very long) road, if I were you!
 
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