The most repeating words in a sentence

pnewortham

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The space between the Rose and and and and and Crown is not the same.

I also know of another one with 11 repeating words. Any takers?
 
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pnewortham

pnewortham

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OK, mainly for @daddyman16 sake, I'm gonna resurrect this if it kills me.

It's a pub sign called the Rose And Crown. The space between the "Rose and And", and "And and Crown" is not the same.

Get it?
 

Dirty Harry

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I heard a similar one. A painter at a chip shop was writing 'fish and chips' on a sign above the shop. The writing was too squashed up. Someone pointed out he needed a bigger space between 'fish" and "and', and 'and' and 'chips". This using the word 'and' five times consecutively.
 
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pnewortham

pnewortham

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I heard a similar one. A painter at a chip shop was writing 'fish and chips' on a sign above the shop. The writing was too squashed up. Someone pointed out he needed a bigger space between 'fish" and "and', and 'and' and 'chips". This using the word 'and' five times consecutively.
Bloody hallelujah 🤓
 

Lee Trundle

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Got one a teacher told me with 2 kids, Jim and John writing the sentence: "I had [had] too many chocolates, so I was too full to eat dinner yesterday."

Jim used had once and John used had twice.

So it's correct to say:

John, where Jim had had "had," had had "had had"

Sure there is an extension of this with 11 hads but I cant remember how it is done
 
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pnewortham

pnewortham

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Got one a teacher told me with 2 kids, Jim and John writing the sentence: "I had [had] too many chocolates, so I was too full to eat dinner yesterday."

Jim used had once and John used had twice.

So it's correct to say:

John, where Jim had had "had," had had "had had"

Sure there is an extension of this with 11 hads but I cant remember how it is done
Haha now we're cooking on gas.

It's a debate whether "had", or "had had" is the correct usage, in an English lesson. The teacher thinks that Jim is correct.

So:

"Jim, where John had had had, had had had had. Had had had had the teacher's approval."
 

PNEESSEX

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There are loads of examples knocking about. The first one I recall being taught was at primary school (yes it was so long ago that I was there that we were taught grammar). It's only the same word repeated three times but it was also a useful thing to remember

"You cannot end a sentence with because because because is a conjunction"



Trying to learn Spanish (and not really making huge headway) I came across this sentence in a language primer: "Como como? Como como como como!" It means "How do I eat? I eat like I eat!" Comer is the verb to eat and other versions of como mean as, how, like.
 

daddyman16

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Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo.

[Buffaloes from Buffalo (a place in the USA) buffalo (a verb that means bully) other buffaloes from Buffalo that buffalo Buffaloes from Buffalo]


Police police police police police police police police police.

[Police from Police (in Poland) who are policed by police-policed-by-police police police-policed-by-police.]
 
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Regardless

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Haha now we're cooking on gas.

It's a debate whether "had", or "had had" is the correct usage, in an English lesson. The teacher thinks that Jim is correct.

So:

"Jim, where John had had had, had had had had. Had had had had the teacher's approval."

Fail. Read the bloody bloody bloody thread title!
 
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