The Park Hotel. Miller Park.

TSR2

Advisor to the Owner
My maternal grandmother worked at the mill on Inkerman Street between Eldon Street and Roebuck Street. She retired unmutilated but stone deaf. I think it was the 'Tacklers' who removed obstructions from the looms - while they were running of course. For these men losing a finger was all in a day's work ☹.

Edit: The mill might have been in Parker Street or even De Lacy Street. Soz.
Hi Sid, I think it was Parker St, I went round on a school trip in 1971, I will never forget the noise in that shed, :eek: and the women having to lip read to each other.
 

Sid Snot

Manager - East Cheam FC
Patron
Hi Sid, I think it was Parker St, I went round on a school trip in 1971, I will never forget the noise in that shed, :eek: and the women having to lip read to each other.

Yes, definitely Parker Street. As a small kid I couldn't stand the noise in there and hated when my mum took me in there. And yes again, my grandmother could lip read, as you say because that was the only way of communicating.
I seem to remember my paternal grandmother working at Horrocks' in New Hall Lane. If I ever went there I don't remember.
 

TSR2

Advisor to the Owner
Yes, definitely Parker Street. As a small kid I couldn't stand the noise in there and hated when my mum took me in there. And yes again, my grandmother could lip read, as you say because that was the only way of communicating.
I seem to remember my paternal grandmother working at Horrocks' in New Hall Lane. If I ever went there I don't remember.
Strange how some images remain embedded in your VHS mind, still remember walking in there, and the tour man explaining how the workers communicate by lip reading
Part of it is now a school with a playing field, a few years ago I went to see my son in a rounders competition on the site,, but half my mind took me back from the peace of the day,to the noise of that day visit.
 

PNEESSEX

Forum Patron
Patron
Yes, definitely Parker Street. As a small kid I couldn't stand the noise in there and hated when my mum took me in there. And yes again, my grandmother could lip read, as you say because that was the only way of communicating.
I seem to remember my paternal grandmother working at Horrocks' in New Hall Lane. If I ever went there I don't remember.
My Grandma could also lip read. She worked in the mill in Higher Walton as a young woman. They used to refer to the mouthing of words whilst making no sound as meemoing (I think that's how you spell it....it's pronounced mee-mo-ing)
 

Sid Snot

Manager - East Cheam FC
Patron
My Grandma could also lip read. She worked in the mill in Higher Walton as a young woman. They used to refer to the mouthing of words whilst making no sound as meemoing (I think that's how you spell it....it's pronounced mee-mo-ing)

I'd forgotten all about that term. My grandmother used the same word. I googled it and it's 'meemaw' and 'meemawing'. Haven't heard that in well over 50 years 👍
 

TSR2

Advisor to the Owner
Pure white smoke - no clag 👍.
😂😂
farp,small,wall_texture,product,750x1000.u1.jpg
 
OP
E

europne

Forum Patron
Patron
I'd forgotten all about that term. My grandmother used the same word. I googled it and it's 'meemaw' and 'meemawing'. Haven't heard that in well over 50 years 👍

And well used by Les Dawson in one of his characters......

Reminded me of my mum and aunty, they would be talking ordinarily and then get to a bit they didn’t want you to hear, and go into meemawing mode, sometimes with hand actions........
 
OP
E

europne

Forum Patron
Patron
Do you also recall when they wanted to catch each other’s attention and they would shout oooooooo-oooooooo!
Again used in the mills, but also on the streets, and I believe also in Northern France, maybe a WW1connection...?
 

PNEESSEX

Forum Patron
Patron
I'd forgotten all about that term. My grandmother used the same word. I googled it and it's 'meemaw' and 'meemawing'. Haven't heard that in well over 50 years 👍
It's no wonder the poor buggers were stone deaf. They started to work in the mills at a young age. I don't know when my grandma started in Higher Walton Mill, but I do know that in the 1901 census she was listed, as a 13 year old, as being part time in the mill and part time at school. Even though she left the mill after WW1 and bought a shop, the damage to her hearing was already done. As a child I was fascinated by her hearing aid which made all sorts of weird crackling and whistling noises. On the other hand, my grandad, who also worked in the mill until WW1 as a cotton weaver, wasn't deaf at all.

 

Sid Snot

Manager - East Cheam FC
Patron
It's no wonder the poor buggers were stone deaf. They started to work in the mills at a young age. I don't know when my grandma started in Higher Walton Mill, but I do know that in the 1901 census she was listed, as a 13 year old, as being part time in the mill and part time at school. Even though she left the mill after WW1 and bought a shop, the damage to her hearing was already done. As a child I was fascinated by her hearing aid which made all sorts of weird crackling and whistling noises. On the other hand, my grandad, who also worked in the mill until WW1 as a cotton weaver, wasn't deaf at all.


My grandmother was very much the same - at 12 years old in 1908 she did a half day at school and half a day working at the mill.

She also had the same make of hearing aid as your grandma 😂
 

Sid Snot

Manager - East Cheam FC
Patron
My Grandma could also lip read. She worked in the mill in Higher Walton as a young woman. They used to refer to the mouthing of words whilst making no sound as meemoing (I think that's how you spell it....it's pronounced mee-mo-ing)

Absolutely, the 'aw' comes out of a Lancashire gob as 'o' 😂
 
Top